Edmonton cops involved in infamous police brutality incident get 35 hours of community service after cutting deal with Chief McFee’s office

An infamous police brutality incident from 2017—in which crown prosecutors declined to lay criminal charges despite a recommendation to do so from ASIRT—has concluded. The police discipline process has ended and the professional consequences for repeatedly kicking and punching someone who was “clearly surrendering” has been decided. Thanks to a deal cut between the officers and Chief Dale McFee’s office the three cops got 35 hours of community service. Two of the three officers were also promoted before the discipline process was complete. 

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POD: Losing is the new winning

After a long hiatus due to moving offices the Progress Report pod is back. Jeremy Appel joins host Duncan Kinney to sift through the wreckage of the Alberta election. They discuss the Alberta NDP's spin on their catastrophic loss as well as what is to be done about the coming UCP cruelty. 

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The struggle against Smith continues, and a fight for the heart of the NDP looms

By now, I’m sure you’ve seen Alberta’s election results. Bad news, eh?

There are a few ways to think about this thing.

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Edmonton police refuse to charge cop after crown prosecutor recommends charges, chief can’t remember specifics

The Pacey Dumas case, where an investigation found that an Edmonton cop had assaulted a young Indigenous man but crown prosecutors then refused to press charges showed how crown prosecutors shielded police from accountability. But a recent report from the Edmonton Police Service shows that the police have the power to quash charges from their end, too.

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UCP’s law and order campaign does exactly what it’s supposed to: help their friends out

Danielle Smith’s UCP are going hard on ‘law and order’ campaigning this season, riding high on the wave of social disorder that COVID, the war on drugs, and decades of rising inequality have cast across North America. But it isn’t just an election strategy—it’s an opportunity to funnel money and power to key donors and allies of the conservative movement. Recent announcements by the UCP about ankle bracelets and police commissions just revealed a couple of them. 

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An Indigenous person was nearly 19 times more likely to get a transit ticket than a white person in 2020-2021 in Edmonton

Edmonton’s transit peace officers are dramatically more likely to issue a transit fine to an Indigenous person than a white person, according to recently released data on ticketing. A local researcher analyzing the most recent numbers—from 2020-2021—finds that an Indigenous person was nearly 19 times more likely to be ticketed by EPS.

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There's a big blind spot in Alberta's spring election—and it's a matter of life and death

Education, healthcare, and jobs are the top issues in Alberta’s spring provincial election—as usual. But there’s one issue that neither of the two big parties seem to want to touch, and it’s a serious and growing problem in Alberta’s cities: police brutality.

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FOIP reveals multiple deaths at drug treatment facilities in Alberta as UCP moves towards forced treatment

Multiple people have died in drug treatment and addiction recovery centres in Alberta, a fact the government of Alberta refused to disclose and took a freedom of information request to reveal. 

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What's the true cost of a pre-election police blitz?

The UCP’s big play over the past two weeks to shift attention away from Premier Danielle Smith’s involvement with COVID scofflaw and extremist pastor Artur Pawlowski has been to pivot towards policing.

The pivot hasn’t stopped reporters from asking about the Pawlowski matter, the pitch is full of misleading details, and it’s a campaign stunt that will cost far more than the $15 million that public safety minister Mike Ellis estimates will be spent on the new officers.

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“Not only inappropriate, but also unethical.” Why is MacEwan University paying $15,000 to help three UCP ministers campaign?

This April 19, less than two weeks before Alberta’s provincial election is expected to begin, MacEwan University in Edmonton is spending $15,000 to sponsor a pre-campaign event for three UCP cabinet ministers.  One democratic governance expert is calling it “not only inappropriate but unethical.” 

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